Mac time machine backup two drives

Use Multiple Drives for Time Machine
Contents:
  1. Time Machine backing up to two drives simultaneously, possible?
  2. Using Time Machine to backup two internal… - Apple Community
  3. How to use multiple drives with Time Machine for redundant backups
  4. A more robust Time Machine backup system just by adding a second drive

This will pop open a list of your current connected drives. Select the disk you want to add from the list. You want to create a complete Time Machine backup on one disk before connecting a different disk. If you already have a Time Machine drive, your Mac will complain slightly about this state of affairs. It will do so with a warning box, asking if you want to replace your existing Time Machine backup and backup drive or if you want to use both disks. The backup will proceed normally, backing up all the Time Machine-eligible files.

Time Machine backing up to two drives simultaneously, possible?

If you are adding two disks, now is the time to get the second disk running. Attach the second drive and repeat the steps above. Time Machine saves the backup history and status of each drive separately. That means they will both track when they were last synced and what was backed up, remaining completely separate.

Using Time Machine to backup two internal… - Apple Community

But macOS also incorporates support for having multiple active backup volumes used for your same source data at the same time. Time Machine begins an initial backup to this volume, which will take as long as the first time you performed a backup with the previous volume.

How to use a Network Drive with Time Machine

As soon as the initial backup is finished, you can eject either of the drives, take it somewhere safe away from your home or business, and the Time Machine backup continues on your remaining volume. Note on formats: Erasing loses all the data on the disk. Email yours to mac macworld.

Note that if you ever erase or restore a volume, it may be treated as a different one even if you give it the same name and put all the same data back on it , so you'll have to exclude or remove it again. It may also get backed-up in full; you might be able to avoid that -- see Troubleshooting item B6. If a drive isn't available such as an external that isn't always connected , Time Machine will just skip it, and continue backing-up all others normally.

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How to use multiple drives with Time Machine for redundant backups

The next time it's available, Time Machine will back up whatever's new or changed since the last backup of that volume. If it's been disconnected for a long time, the next backup may be longer than usual. The backups of each volume are kept separately within the backups for your Mac.

That means you may need to do some things slightly differently to view or restore from the backups of the various volumes.

A more robust Time Machine backup system just by adding a second drive

See below for details. Backing-up multiple OSX volumes presents some different issues.

If you have a "dual boot" setup with, for example, Lion installed on one volume and Snow Leopard on another, you have four options: It's usually best, simplest, and safest to back them up separately, to different volumes. The two volumes can be different drives, or different partitions on the same drive.


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On the Lion volume, exclude the Snow Leopard volume from backups, and on the Snow Leopard volume, exclude the Lion volume. See question 10 for exclusion instructions.

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The downside is, if you make changes to the Lion volume from the Snow Leopard volume, those changes won't be backed-up until you boot into Lion and run a backup. See question 5 for partitioning instructions of a new drive or one you don't mind erasing, or question 6 to add a partition to an existing drive. If you're backing-up to a Time Capsule which can't be partitioned , consider connecting a USB drive to it or directly to your Mac , and backing-up one OSX volume to it. Back up both from one OSX volume only.

The downside is, if you make a lot of changes while running on the one where Time Machine is off, they aren't backed-up until you switch to the other volume and a backup runs.